Felicia Wu Song | Digital Life as Secular Liturgy

Felicia Wu Song | Digital Life as Secular Liturgy

In a presentation from our 2019 theology conference, Dr. Felicia Wu Song shares a talk entitled, "Digital Life as Secular Liturgy: A Matter of Christian Formation." Dr. Song is a professor of sociology at Westmont College. What is the social imaginary implied in our modern secular life? What effects does social life have on our embodied relationships? How should our Christian faith commitments affect the way we think about social media, constant social stimulation, and the omnipresence of devices in our digital ecology? Dr. Song explores these and other questions in the first half of her presentation.


Todd Wilson | Mere Sexuality

Todd Wilson | Mere Sexuality

CPT President Todd Wilson gave this lecture at the 2016 national conference of the CPT: Beauty, Order, and Mystery – A Christian Vision of Sexuality. According to Dr. Wilson, there is a need for Christians to reclaim what he calls "Mere Sexuality," the historic Christian consensus regarding gender and human sexuality that existed virtually unchallenged for the first two millennia of the church's existence. This can be attributed to two primary factors, argues Wilson: 1) the fracturing of functional biblical authority and 2) the reshaping of moral intuitions in modern Western culture.


Paul Taylor | The Intersection of Technology and Theology

Paul Taylor | The Intersection of Technology and Theology

Paul Taylor, Teaching Pastor and Elder at Peninsula Bible Church in Palo Alto, CA, joins the podcast to discuss the intersection of theology and technology. How should the church respond as technological advance continues and accelerates? How does the Christian theological narrative interact advances in artificial intelligence and the philosophies of post-humanism?


Karen Swallow Prior | Christianity, Reading, and Literature

Karen Swallow Prior | Christianity, Reading, and Literature

How can Christians and pastors benefit from literary reading? Karen Swallow Prior, author of On Reading Well, joins the podcast. Dr. Prior is a Professor of English at Liberty University. In these episodes she discusses her childhood fascination with reading. She also talks about her career as a professor and the distinction between fiction, non-fiction, literary and non-literary writings. She also discusses her recent book on virtue, literature, and the good life––as well as ways that pastors and churches can benefit from exploring literary reading and writing.


Eric Johnson | Christian Psychology and Spiritual Formation

Eric Johnson | Christian Psychology and Spiritual Formation

Eric Johnson, professor of Christian psychology at Houston Baptist University, joins the podcast to discuss the integration of scripture, theology, and psychology. How should Christians think about the scientific conclusions of secular disciplines governed by naturalistic worldviews? What are the philosophical and methodological concerns when relating biblical wisdom with scientific inquiry?


Owen Strachan | What Does It Mean To Be Human?

Owen Strachan | What Does It Mean To Be Human?

Owen Strachan, Professor of Christian Theology at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, joins the podcast to discuss his upcoming book Reenchanting Humanity: A Theology of Mankind (B&H Academic). Owen argues that the nature of human beings is and will continue to be one of the most pressing questions not only in the church but in the Western culture as a whole in the 21st century. He hopes that the book will help fill what he sees as a shortage of quality theological texts on theological anthropology. The book will release on August 1, 2019.


Gerald Hiestand | Confronting the Separation between Theology and the Church

Gerald Hiestand | Confronting the Separation between Theology and the Church

Gerald Hiestand, Senior Pastor of Calvary Memorial Church and Co-Founder of the CPT, joins the podcast again to discuss the inception of the CPT as an organization. What was its original vision for the organization and what is the vision for its future? What opportunities are there for those who love theological scholarship but do not have opportunity or feel called to the academy?